• Memorials for the Victims of the Baranovichi Ghetto
Several memorials in the Belarusian town of Baranovichi (Polish: Baranowicze) commemorate its Jewish residents murdered in 1941 and 1942.
Image: Baranovichi, undated, Destroyed houses, Belaruski dzyarshaŭny muzej gistoryi Vyalikay Aytchynnay Vayny
Baranovichi, undated, Destroyed houses, Belaruski dzyarshaŭny muzej gistoryi Vyalikay Aytchynnay Vayny

Image: Baranovichi, 2004, Memorial stone in Tsaryuka Street, the inscription reads: »Located in the town in 1941-1942 was a Jewish ghetto, which 12,000 citizens fell victim to«, Stiftung Denkmal
Baranovichi, 2004, Memorial stone in Tsaryuka Street, the inscription reads: »Located in the town in 1941-1942 was a Jewish ghetto, which 12,000 citizens fell victim to«, Stiftung Denkmal
At least 9,000 Jews lived in Baranovichi before the Second World War, making up about half of the city's population. Between 1920 and 1939 Baranovichi belonged to Poland; after Poland's occupation by Germany and the Soviet Union, Baranovichi came under Soviet rule. Many Jewish refugees from the German-occupied territories came to Baranovichi at the time. It is estimated that there were up to 12,000 Jews in the town in the summer of 1941.
After Germany's assault against the Soviet Union, the German Wehrmacht occupied Baranovichi on June 25, 1941. Along with the army came numerous SS and civil administration authorities. In July 1941, Einsatzkommando 8 (mobile killing unit) under the command of Otto Bradfisch was in town and murdered around 350 Jews. On December 12, 1941, a ghetto for the Jewish population was established. Nearly 12,000 Jews had to live in a very small area and perform forced labour. The first »Aktion« took place on March 3 and 4, 1942, upon orders of Territorial Commissioner Rudolph Werner: members of Belarusian, Latvian and Lithuanian police troops, headed by the German Security Police (SiPo), shot 2,000 Jews, according to some sources they killed as many as 6,000 Jews. A further 10-day »Aktion« was launched on September 22, 1942, during which SiPo and SD (Security Service) shot about 3,000 Jews. The third and last »Aktion« took place on December 17, during which 3000 Jews perished.
Image: Baranovichi, undated, Destroyed houses, Belaruski dzyarshaŭny muzej gistoryi Vyalikay Aytchynnay Vayny
Baranovichi, undated, Destroyed houses, Belaruski dzyarshaŭny muzej gistoryi Vyalikay Aytchynnay Vayny

Image: Baranovichi, 2004, Memorial stone in Tsaryuka Street, the inscription reads: »Located in the town in 1941-1942 was a Jewish ghetto, which 12,000 citizens fell victim to«, Stiftung Denkmal
Baranovichi, 2004, Memorial stone in Tsaryuka Street, the inscription reads: »Located in the town in 1941-1942 was a Jewish ghetto, which 12,000 citizens fell victim to«, Stiftung Denkmal
The memorial is dedicated to the murdered Jews of Baranovichi. different sources, the SS murdered between 8,000 and 12,000 Jews. Amongst them were many refugees from the German-occupied territories of Poland. Jews from surrounding areas were also forcibly relocated to Baranovichi ghetto in 1942. Many Jews from Baranovichi perished in the nearby forced labour camp Koldichevo.
Image: Baranovichi, 2004, Obelisk in the former Jewish cemetery, Stiftung Denkmal
Baranovichi, 2004, Obelisk in the former Jewish cemetery, Stiftung Denkmal
There is a memorial stone in Tsaryuka Street, dedicated to the victims of the ghetto. Its inscription reads: »Located in the town in 1941-1942 was a Jewish ghetto, which 12,000 citizens fell victim to.«
Apart from this stone there are several other memorials remembering the victims of the Holocaust. On the spot of the former Jewish cemetery there is an obelisk, erected in 1992. According to the inscription, it was donated by Jews in Israel and around the world. Here, the ashes of several thousand Jews are buried who were murdered in the mass shootings of 1942. Their remains were brought here upon request of their surviving relatives.
In a forest in the north-eastern part of town, a memorial was inaugurated in 1972. Exactly thirty years before, the SS murdered about 3,000 Czech Jews on the spot who had been deported from the Theresienstadt ghetto.
Image: Baranovichi, 2004, Inscription on the obelisk in the former Jewish cemetery, Stiftung Denkmal
Baranovichi, 2004, Inscription on the obelisk in the former Jewish cemetery, Stiftung Denkmal

Image: Baranovichi, 2004, Memorial for 3,000 Jews from the Theresienstadt ghetto who were murdered here, Stiftung Denkmal
Baranovichi, 2004, Memorial for 3,000 Jews from the Theresienstadt ghetto who were murdered here, Stiftung Denkmal
Name
Pamjatniki shertwam Baranowitscheskogo getto
Phone
+375 163 473 357
Open
The memorial is accessible at all times.